feuds

Sweet and Vicious: Why Do Desserts Bring Out the Worst in People?

Sweet and Vicious: Why Do Desserts Bring Out the Worst in People?

Photo: American Stock/Getty Images

Cupcakes, pies: They sure can make people behave in unseemly ways. Is it the adrenaline-pumping sugar rush? The sheer deliciousness that drives mere mortals to passion and violence? Lately, it seems that desserts are turning from sweet to sour. More straight ahead.

In Boston, the Herald reports that things turned bitter this week at an upscale bakery during a "vocabulary debate over a birthday cake." The customers thought their Yo Gabba Gabba cake would have "fondue" icing; the clerk corrected them that the cake would actually possess, ahem, fondant. To which the customer responded, per the Herald: "Fondue, fondant, who gives a $%&%!" Things got heated, cops were summoned, and now we know what Cake Boss should've been called!

Even celebrities fall prey to such temptations: Keith Richards just revealed in his new autobiography, Life, that he frequently gets into arguments over the quality of his custard. Not long ago, Dina Lohan engaged in an ice-cream meltdown at Carvel when she was denied a free Fudgie the Whale. And two star football players at Eastern Carolina University were suspended last year after flipping over tables at an awards' luncheon while competing for the last piece of cheesecake.

The problem's even gone political: Maine and Pennsylvania are locked in a heated battle over who invented the innocuous-seeming Whoopie pie.

Suddenly the term "Crack Pie" seems a lot more apt.

Customer Charged in Fight Over Icing [Herald]
Related: Pie Fight: Who Made Whoopies First?

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