prowling

Tony Maws Grew Up in a Kitchenless Home, Prowls Chinatown for Meals, and Thinks We Need to Get Over Our New York Inferiority Complex

Tony Maws: Proud Bostonian. Chinatown denizen. Book subject!

Tony Maws: Proud Bostonian. Chinatown denizen. Book subject!

Tony Maws chats with Food Republic over (several) beers about coming of age in the South End, in a brownstone where the family's kitchen was under construction for a few years. During those kitchenless days, the impressionable young Maws prowled Chinatown for abalone and bliss. He revisits his favorite haunts in the piece and reflects on why Boston is not New York, shouldn't be New York, and is pretty damn wonderful in its own right. He also eats eel.

Maws and the writer (who admits to being slightly tipsy, which is totally the best way to experience Chinatown anyway) head over to Peach Farm for a slurp-fest. Maws says his favorite Chinatown dives are Peach Farm, Jumbo Seafood and Dumpling House. (He says to get the eel at Jumbo; we agree.)

Maws, clearly in a confessional phase, also chats about his hometown versus New York. "There’s this complex and I wish we could get over it. I’m from here and a lot of us have this complex that Boston isn’t as good as New York and Boston doesn’t compare to New York. My whole thing is that there is no comparison necessary: Boston is Boston and New York is New York. We don’t have the boroughs, we don’t have the population. Boston is a very different city. Whenever New Yorkers say, “Boston… whatever” or Bostonians say “New York… whatever” or “We don’t have what New York has,” well, we don’t, but we shouldn’t. We have what we have. In the middle of our city we have M.I.T, Harvard, BU and a river going through the heart of it. There’s tremendous stuff here." Yes, even doughnuts.

So, Monsieur Maws, does this mean we shouldn't expect a Craigie New York in the future?

A Late Night Out With Mr. Boston Tony Maws. Live Eels Involved [FR]
Earlier: Go Behind the Scenes With Tony Maws in a Juicy New Book

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