grub guide

Grub Guide: Blizzard-Approved Soups

Slurp up some matzo ball soup at S&S.

Slurp up some matzo ball soup at S&S.Photo: Lonely Havens

As we type with frosty fingers during the 56th blizzard of the season, we thought it'd be nice to round up a list of some warm and toasty soups. Nothing will heat you up quicker ... nothing besides a hot-buttered rum, of course. But for those of us who actually have to work today, some sober (and soothing) options.

UpStairs on the Square, Harvard Square, Old Fashioned Tomato Soup, Mini Farm House Cheddar & Brioche Grilled Cheese: A slightly dressed-up version of the wintery classic. Watch the snow fall in the square; feel proper in the swanky dining room. Slurp quietly.

Tom Yum Koong, Various Locations, Tom Yum Koong Soup: Their namesake soup is a healing vat of hot and sour milk spiked with chili, bobbling with shrimp, tomatoes, and coconut, topped off with a pungent bundle of scallions. Guaranteed to chase away cold germs, hangovers, and frostbite.

S&S, Inman Square, Matzo Ball Soup: The menu is long at this Inman Square institution, but the matzo ball soup is the reason to visit. A bulbous, spongy matzo ball, soaking up warm broth (maybe paired with a cheese blintz), will fortify you for the rest of the day.

Deuxave, Back Bay, Nine-Hour French Onion Soup: A rich concoction of caramelized onion, comte cheese, and, yes, a beef bone marrow crouton. Fun fact: The "nine-hour" soup actually takes three days to prepare: Ten hours for beef stock made with beef bones, nine hours for onions to caramelize, 12 hours to infuse the beef stock with beef shanks ... you get the idea. On the other hand, it will take you roughly five minutes to devour.

JoJo Taipei, Allston, Taiwanese Style Hot and Soup: The best $2.99 you'll spend all day. Clear, straightforward, spicy, nourishing: everything you want in a shamefully cheap soup, at one of Boston's best Chinese restaurants.

Island Creek Oyster Bar, Kenmore Square, Clam Chowder: Creamy and decadent, with the impossibly fresh clams you'd expect from the ICOB folks. But it's the smoky cured bacon that puts this soup over the edge into vice territory.

Pho 2000, Dorchester, Pho (Duh): We think the best pho in town isn't in Chinatown but on Adams Street in Dorchester, where you'll find an array of pho options. We favor the Ðặc Biệt, also known as beef noodle soup, which layers sliced rare steak, brisket, beef flank, tendon, and tripe in an aromatic broth.


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